011818: From the Museums

Snow and cold outside. Another opportunity to dig back into the archives. The last two posts contained images from museums and they obviously contained fossils that were finished to the finest standards – very different from my usual finds. I like the aesthetics of each for different reasons.

So this week I decided to continue an exploration of my museum shoots and see what I might have missed the first time around. Most of today’s images are newly worked and there is much more there to be mined!

Here are five sets of images – three in each – from five different museum collections. The first three images (above) are from the collection of the Paleontological Research Institution in Trumansburg NY.

===============

The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven CT

*****

*****

===============

The New York State Museum, Albany NY

*****

*****

===============

The Gallery of Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy, Paris, France

*****

*****

===============

The Natural History Museum of Florence, Florence, Italy

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit.

Advertisements

011118: Crinoids

Last week, while reviewing the bivalve images I had taken during my two trips to the Paleontological Research Institute, I ran across and was reminded of all the beautiful crinoids that I found in their collections as well.

Crinoids  are oftentimes referred to contemporaneously as Sea Lillies, thanks I believe to their shape. They are also thought of as “living fossils” since they can be traced all the way back to the Ordovician period she 450 million years ago!

I have had the good fortune of photographing crinoids from a number of museum collections. I personally find them to be something rather magical. So I spent a few days immersed in the world of crinoids that I am now sharing with you this week.

In order to fill out this week’s post I have augmented the PRI crinoids with some from the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven Connecticut.

These first seven images are from the PRI collection.

*****

The remaining eight images (below) are from the Yale Peabody collection.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit.

010418: Bivalves and Barnacles

Several years ago I had the opportunity to photograph parts of the fossil collection belonging to the Paleontological Research Institute in Trumansburg, NY. Among the many and varied fossils I worked with were these barnacle laden bivalves. Since I have long forgotten the technical/historical information on these marine invertebrates I cannot give you any accurate information on them – other than to say that they are uniquely beautiful and intriguing. I hope you think so as well.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit. And best wishes to all of you at the start of this new year!

STAY WARM!!!

Winter’s Bounty

_MG_1923_01_LR_15For me, “Winter’s bounty” translates into a rich backlog of unprocessed images left over from a very busy Summer. And now, finally, with snow on the ground and outdoor temperatures uncomfortable, I can revisit images that I simply didn’t have the opportunity or time to process.

IMG_4828_01_LR_12One fine example is my last visit (back in August) to the Museum of the Earth and the collection of the Paleontological Research Institution. At the time I had managed to post nine or ten images from that trip – just the ones that jumped out at me. But, as you can see from today’s selection of images, there was so much more – and there are more still to come in future posts.

IMG_4940_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_4723_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_4749_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_5262_01_LR_12_______________

IMG_4865_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_5296_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_4798_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_5366_01_LR_10_______________

IMG_5307_01_LR_12Should you ever find yourself in the Ithaca area drop by the Museum of the Earth. There is much to see – fine fossils, great exhibits, and events for the entire family.

Thank you as always for visiting this site. More images at www.artmurphy.com

Subscribe at my homepage  https://artandfossils.wordpress.com

Ancient Crinoids

I missed posting last week. I was on the road and just got back. I have some catching up to do. So fewer words this week – just some images I had been working on before my departure. First, though, let me point to the above image. “Ancient Crinoids” is its title and it is part of a juried show set to open on Saturday, June 2, 5-7 PM, at the Limner Gallery in Hudson, N.Y. The annual show is entitled “Arte Natura” and this is my second consecutive appearance. It will remain up for the entire month of June.

The image itself was made while shooting fossils from the collection of The Paleontological Research Institution following my show at the Museum of the Earth six months ago. More images from that visual adventure can be found at two of my January posts:

New Adventures

More From PRI

Personal matters beckoned last week and, for the second time in as many months, took me below the “Mason-Dixon Line” (or as James McMurtry lovingly refers to it: the “Mason-Dumbass Line”). The land of shopping malls and churches that you sometimes can’t even tell apart! Weather often so hot and muggy that one might take it as preparation for Dante’s Inferno.

In the midst of such brutal conditions, we found our way, thanks to strong recommendations, to a lovely little frozen yogurt shop called Sweet Frog – self serve, more toppings than one could imagine, fine selection of flavors, and just the cutest little frog logo. I would have recommended it to anyone myself until I walked over to the wall to look at the t-shirts for sale. There was that “sweet froggie” on the tee reciting Scripture:

This is what you get with your frozen yogurt in Virginia, the Trans-Vaginal Ultrasound state.

No more fundamentalist yogurt. No more bible quoting frogs. Here are some fossils.

Thank you as always for visiting. More images at www.artmurphy.com

Subscribe to this blog at my homepage https://artandfossils.wordpress.com