053118: A Rediscovered Folder

A year ago, as we prepared a party for the opening of my new studio, I threw a few hundred image into a slide show that looped on my computer screen throughout the afternoon.

Yesterday I ran across that folder – hadn’t seen it since then. I took some time to look through it and took a liking to this seemingly unlikely mix. I guess it’s an indication of the things I found interesting at the time – all things natural, I suppose.

Some things local and some things from far away, including “natural” objects from the Natural History Museum in Florence, Italy.

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052418: A Visit to the Quarry

I had an opportunity a few days ago to drop by my favorite local quarry. In earlier days I would dig there weekly. But lately my visits are few and far between. On these recent ¬†returns I often feel like I’m visiting a fresh, new site.

The owner cuts into the side of the hill, taking ground fill and crushed rock away for his construction sites. Seldom are there any fossils in that part of the quarry. Instead, though, there are fine shooting opportunities as these first five images indicate. (By the way, the hill off in the distance is part of the eastern escarpment of the Catskills).

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Eventually, I made my way to the shelf that contains the fossils. There are always plenty to find. So today’s post is the result of that one trip – a nice selection of mostly ordinary 387 million year old marine invertebrate fossils, all dirty and broken but fascinating nonetheless.

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One surprise for me this trip were these gastropods I found – not particularly special but not often found at this site.

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Thanks for the visit.

051018: #300

I just discovered the other day that today’s post is my 300th. I hadn’t been counting so it caught me somewhat by surprise. It seems obvious that I like creating this (mostly) weekly exercise. And I do. It has served me well – helping to keep a creative flow through all of the seemingly endless distractions we all experience. Let me take a moment to thank you for your many kind responses over years.

New images and reconfigured images are mixed together in this post. I hope you enjoy them.

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Just recently, LeScienze, the Italian edition of Scientific American, ran an article on their website that was taken from a recent post of mine. Six images of museum crinoids, some of my favorites. All done with fully proper request and reply – not something that always happens in the “free” world of the internet! So, my great thanks to Ms Priscilla Di Thiene for the interest. It is always an honor to have my work displayed on your site.

http://www.lescienze.it/news/2018/04/27/foto/crinoidi_art_murphy-3932586/1/#1

Thanks for the visit.

041218: Nature in Abstract

Today’s mix of images reflect, to me at least, a simple beauty in the world that surrounds us. Sometimes it takes a moment to stop and look a bit closer. These images speak to a series of those moments that I wish to share.

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A fine endnote for today – our first flower of the spring!

Thanks for the visit.

032918: A March Mix

This week fossils segue into some very colorful rocks (from a local quarry) and end up with my newest subject (that I first introduced last week) – a glass paperweight.

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Thanks for the visit.

032218: Fossils From the Neighborhood

Today’s first and last images are colorful bookends to the latest group of fossil images. This strange, lyrical image (above) is the result of playing with a glass paperweight. Contained within are various stringy objects that act as design elements. The fun in creating an image like this is in the use of various color reflectors and lights of varying color temperatures. A simple desk object now suggests other worlds – something that I plan to explore further.

In the meantime, enjoy the mix of marine invertebrates from 387 million years ago.

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This other bookend – a dragonfly’s wings – heavily infused with color!

Thanks for the visit.

031518: Waiting for Spring

As I was reworking this fossil image I realized a desperate need for some color in my life. Three nor’easters in the first two weeks of March have tested my resolve as I (and many others) await the first real signs of Spring.

Drab, colorless days have forced me back into my libraries in search of colorful signs of life. So the rest of today’s post is a riot of colors that (hopefully) will soon be upon us – personally well needed given that snow is falling¬†once again as I write this!

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Thanks for the visit.