0416: Too Nice to Be Inside

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Today I have three groups of fresh images – all thanks to the onset of Spring. It’s just too beautiful to sit here writing so I’ll be brief. The first group are snail shaped fossils found at the quarry this past week. They are generally much harder to find up there (compared with brachiopods – they’re next). So my season of digging and hunting for fossils has begun on a good note!

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Next are the brachiopods – again, all (and many more) from the same two visits. It’s easy to forget that all of these squiggly little things, these marine invertebrate life forms lived right here nearly 400 million years ago!

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And there was plenty of time to reacquaint with the neighboring woods.

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Finally, a reminder – my current show at the Marist College Art Gallery will remain up until Saturday April 25th. If you should find yourself in the Poughkeepsie area please come by. It’s a beautiful show in a terrific space. (The above image courtesy of my dearest friends at Katvan Studio).

Thanks for today’s visit.

0402: Coral

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Several days ago, while we were experiencing the (hopefully) final snow melt, the first fossil to show itself was this piece of Devonian coral. It’s one I had found down at a local dry creek bed last year. So, first to catch my attention this new season deserved to be immortalized – a funny notion given that its age is somewhere in the neighborhood of 387 million years old.

Later that day I ran across a wonderful series of modern day coral images made by photographer Silvie Burie. I thought I’d share a few with you today (they are the four square images to follow). While their beauty is undeniable, so too is their general fragility, given issues of global climate change – particularly the changing temperatures of ocean currents. Just something to think about as I juxtapose Ms Burie’s subjects with images of their ancestors found here in the Hudson Valley.

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Before I finish today, I’d like to take a moment to thank Mr. Ed Smith, Gallery Director and Professor of Art at Marist College, for giving me the opportunity to show my work at the Marist College Art Gallery. The opening reception was last night and the show will run through April 25th. Mondays through Saturdays 12:00- 5:00.

Ed’s a real master. He treated my new series better than I could have possibly imagined and made it (along with the work of painter Fran O’Neill) into a wonderful show. I couldn’t have been happier. So, if you are in the vicinity of the gallery please drop by and have a look.

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And, finally, I’ll leave you with two new images. I pulled out a few fossils I brought back from Italy and decided to explore some new treatments.

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Thanks for the visit.