062818: Afternoon Light

Like everything else outside my studio, my deck (where I often photograph) and its railing is always covered with fossil rocks. I try to keep new finds and old favorites close and in view. Different times of day, different weather conditions, even different seasons seem to imbue each fossil with “different personalities!”

Late afternoon sun was the trigger for this week’s images. A hard, warm light catches the deck and rakes across the rocks, providing definition and a little drama.

Once again, these are all Devonian Period marine invertebrates (app. 387 million years old), all found within a few miles from my studio! As if just living here in the upper Hudson Valley isn’t enough!

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

_______________

I’ve been busy in several directions lately. So I thought I’d include a couple of mixed media pieces from the week past.

Thanks for the visit.

Advertisements

062118: Continued

I couldn’t resist using last week’s backdrop again for this week’s images. Today’s fossils include gastropods, brachiopods, crinoid ossicles, coral, and various trilobite parts (including the one below – a Moroccan trilobite I bought in a Florence flea market). All the rest make up a nice little Devonian sampler.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit.

051018: #300

I just discovered the other day that today’s post is my 300th. I hadn’t been counting so it caught me somewhat by surprise. It seems obvious that I like creating this (mostly) weekly exercise. And I do. It has served me well – helping to keep a creative flow through all of the seemingly endless distractions we all experience. Let me take a moment to thank you for your many kind responses over years.

New images and reconfigured images are mixed together in this post. I hope you enjoy them.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

_______________

Just recently, LeScienze, the Italian edition of Scientific American, ran an article on their website that was taken from a recent post of mine. Six images of museum crinoids, some of my favorites. All done with fully proper request and reply – not something that always happens in the “free” world of the internet! So, my great thanks to Ms Priscilla Di Thiene for the interest. It is always an honor to have my work displayed on your site.

http://www.lescienze.it/news/2018/04/27/foto/crinoidi_art_murphy-3932586/1/#1

Thanks for the visit.

032918: A March Mix

This week fossils segue into some very colorful rocks (from a local quarry) and end up with my newest subject (that I first introduced last week) – a glass paperweight.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit.

032218: Fossils From the Neighborhood

Today’s first and last images are colorful bookends to the latest group of fossil images. This strange, lyrical image (above) is the result of playing with a glass paperweight. Contained within are various stringy objects that act as design elements. The fun in creating an image like this is in the use of various color reflectors and lights of varying color temperatures. A simple desk object now suggests other worlds – something that I plan to explore further.

In the meantime, enjoy the mix of marine invertebrates from 387 million years ago.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

This other bookend – a dragonfly’s wings – heavily infused with color!

Thanks for the visit.

111617: Moss

This little sprig of moss snaking its way across a fossil cephalopod gave me the idea for this week’s post. I’ve been leaf blowing lately here in the woods, hoping to keep my fossils from disappearing from view. And, in doing so, I noticed how so much moss has already covered the surfaces of many rocks. The vibrant greens draw the eye.

The more I looked the more I appreciated the juxtaposition between the moss and the fossils themselves. Exploring that became my focus this week.

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Thanks for the visit.

101917: What’s Near at Hand

When I moved my studio months ago my biggest task was bringing my fossil rocks along. After all, I had amassed thousands over the years. At first the task seemed insurmountable. But, with much determination, I slogged on. If they were important enough to collect them in the first place, I thought, then they were important enough to bring along.

At some point in the process all I could do was drop many of them into piles all around the new studio – where they have sat ever since. Now that they are rapidly being covered by the falling leaves I decided to poke around to reacquaint myself. And in doing so I came to realize that they very naturally displayed their beauty despite their random placements.

Today’s images reflect that thought. No need for special attention or proper positioning. No need to look far and wide for new locations to explore. Everything I need seems to be right outside my door!

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

*****

Even my piles of props seemed to have some fresh appeal. Nothing earthshaking here but rather a creative exercise that made the day make sense for me!

*****

*****

*****

*****

And when I was done I set my camera down on my desk, noticing how the late afternoon sun streamed through my window. This time the source of inspiration was my plastic water bottle. Inverting the image gave me this.

Thanks for the visit.