080918: Stuff

I found a rusty old box at a yard sale last Saturday. I never know when something like that might make a good prop. The deal came to one dollar but I had to take its contents. I am now the proud owner of a rusty box full of rusty nuts and bolts. And that is how artists’ studios fill up with all kinds of stuff. Some might even call it junk.

As I looked at the contents of the box I soon realized that I have shelves and boxes full of stuff, work surfaces filled with multiple items, etc. And that’s today’s subject – all from my studio inside and out. Nuts and bolts followed by a near infinity of paint brushes to…

Chalks

Box of Props

Reams of Scribbled Paper

Wiry Branches

Dead and Dying Flowers

Gourds

Fossils

Shells

A Garden of Props

Rocks from Jasper Beach

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On a completely different note, I ran across these two images in an old folder and had to bring them out – both from about ten years ago.

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One final note – we’ll be away for a couple of weeks, eating lots of ice cream!

Thanks for the visit.

062917: Back to Fossils

A surprise, last minute trip to Cape Cod pulled me away from the blog last week. Between that and my last two bw posts of NYC I found myself missing my fossils! So I decided to return today with a full body of fossil images. They seem to be gaining more drama lately.

For those of you unfamiliar with these 387 million year old former denizens of my neighborhood I’ll attempt to provide identification (as best I can). Above are several types of coral accompanied by an impression of a trilobite pygidium (center left).

Not exactly sure what this is. The pattern suggests to me some form of coral.

Coral.

Cephalopods. I count at least four in this cluster.

One lone cephalopod.

An interesting mix – resting atop a brachiopod is part of the head (cephalon) and eye of a trilobite. That long dark cylinder I believe might be a small crinoid stem.

I can only think this is a slice of a brachiopod.

Sitting atop a bed of coral is a small rock loaded with crinoid ossicles (the round things). They essentially stacked to form the stem of the crinoid.

Brachiopods

Another brachiopod with some coral in the upper left.

Yet another brachiopod! Actually, there were some 12,000 or more various types.

And these (yes, brachiopods also) are different – they are the only fossils in this post not from the Catskill area. I dug them up several years ago while on a trip to Nashville.

A mess of fossils sitting out on an old table.

And, last but certainly not least, are a group of tentaculites, something I seldom find around here. I came across these along Kaaterskill Creek. I particularly love this one as it reminds me of an old retro sci-fi rocket ship! Fossils and rocket ships put a smile on my face!!

Thanks for the visit.