032218: Fossils From the Neighborhood

Today’s first and last images are colorful bookends to the latest group of fossil images. This strange, lyrical image (above) is the result of playing with a glass paperweight. Contained within are various stringy objects that act as design elements. The fun in creating an image like this is in the use of various color reflectors and lights of varying color temperatures. A simple desk object now suggests other worlds – something that I plan to explore further.

In the meantime, enjoy the mix of marine invertebrates from 387 million years ago.

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This other bookend – a dragonfly’s wings – heavily infused with color!

Thanks for the visit.

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031518: Waiting for Spring

As I was reworking this fossil image I realized a desperate need for some color in my life. Three nor’easters in the first two weeks of March have tested my resolve as I (and many others) await the first real signs of Spring.

Drab, colorless days have forced me back into my libraries in search of colorful signs of life. So the rest of today’s post is a riot of colors that (hopefully) will soon be upon us – personally well needed given that snow is falling once again as I write this!

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Thanks for the visit.

030848: March Diversion

Before the snow hit I managed to visit the local beaver pond for today’s opening image – a bit of ice on the surface late in the day. The remainder of today’s post consists of older images, some fresh some reworked – all with a much heavier hand than usual.

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I’ll close with one more from the beaver pond and one out my studio window yesterday afternoon.

We’re all looking forward to Spring!

Thanks for the visit.

030118: Two From Maine

The northernmost coast of Maine (oddly enough known as “Down East” Maine) is a rocky coast with an occasional sandy beach cropping up. Jasper Beach, home of a billion billion stones, is one of them. And it is great fun to visit.

One of my visits yielded two distinctly different series of images that I have for you today. The first seven images focus on the beach sands and the other seven on the rock walls that surround. As you will plainly see, each is a vastly different series – all within a “stone’s throw!”

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Part Two – The Rocky Walls.

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Found on the beach, this last little oddity is a piece of kelp that wrapped itself around a rock and dried into a mold of the rock. An odd but certainly interesting new object.

Thanks for the visit.

022218: A New Mix

A new project has had me busy lately – a little mixing and matching of work that I have shown in the past – just presented a bit differently.

Some rocks and some fossils in the rocks.

More info on this project to come. In the meantime, here are the selected images.

All these images were taken in New York, Vermont, and Maine – a nice sampling of geologic and paleontological eye candy from the Northeast United States!

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Thanks for the visit.

020818: Stranger Things (Rock Version)

While putting images together for an upcoming project I ran across the opening image of plant fossils that seems to have an almost calligraphic feel to it – a sort of written signage from Nature itself! All of today’s images come from days of shooting several years ago during the summer following Hurricane Irene. The tumult from the flooding tore apart Schoharie Creek and uncovered many amazing things. Some of the images are plant fossils (with a few marine invertebrates if you look closely), some are very strange looking rocks and markings, and some are a total mystery to me.

Funny how so many of these images seem more alien than all of last week’s post – seemingly earthlike landscapes of Mars!

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Thanks for the visit.

 

020118: New Landscapes

Since the earliest days of photography the landscape has provided seemingly endless subject matter for the adventurous photographer. From the exploits of William Henry Jackson in the 1800s to Ansel Adams in the 1900s to today’s latest crop of photographers, gaining access to the “perfect” vantage point has always been key.

As technology has rapidly advanced that access has expanded greatly. Aerial photography gave us fresh and new views of our environment. Drones have now vastly expanded that view.

And today satellites and space missions have introduced us to views we never could have  imagined. In a previous post (Circles and Arcs) I introduced stunning images of Saturn and its moons taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

Today’s images come from NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover. Yes, these landscapes, or should I say “Marscapes”, show us scenes that seem almost familiar.

Thanks to the fine people at NASA there are huge collections of images available to all for viewing. In the case of Mars there are many, many high resolution images available with all necessary scientific information relating to each specific location photographed.

FYI – NASA’s budget continues to be cut. Non-science bureaucrats have been given the reins at government agencies

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Thanks for the visit.