032918: A March Mix

This week fossils segue into some very colorful rocks (from a local quarry) and end up with my newest subject (that I first introduced last week) – a glass paperweight.

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032218: Fossils From the Neighborhood

Today’s first and last images are colorful bookends to the latest group of fossil images. This strange, lyrical image (above) is the result of playing with a glass paperweight. Contained within are various stringy objects that act as design elements. The fun in creating an image like this is in the use of various color reflectors and lights of varying color temperatures. A simple desk object now suggests other worlds – something that I plan to explore further.

In the meantime, enjoy the mix of marine invertebrates from 387 million years ago.

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This other bookend – a dragonfly’s wings – heavily infused with color!

Thanks for the visit.

030848: March Diversion

Before the snow hit I managed to visit the local beaver pond for today’s opening image – a bit of ice on the surface late in the day. The remainder of today’s post consists of older images, some fresh some reworked – all with a much heavier hand than usual.

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I’ll close with one more from the beaver pond and one out my studio window yesterday afternoon.

We’re all looking forward to Spring!

Thanks for the visit.

022218: A New Mix

A new project has had me busy lately – a little mixing and matching of work that I have shown in the past – just presented a bit differently.

Some rocks and some fossils in the rocks.

More info on this project to come. In the meantime, here are the selected images.

All these images were taken in New York, Vermont, and Maine – a nice sampling of geologic and paleontological eye candy from the Northeast United States!

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Thanks for the visit.

020818: Stranger Things (Rock Version)

While putting images together for an upcoming project I ran across the opening image of plant fossils that seems to have an almost calligraphic feel to it – a sort of written signage from Nature itself! All of today’s images come from days of shooting several years ago during the summer following Hurricane Irene. The tumult from the flooding tore apart Schoharie Creek and uncovered many amazing things. Some of the images are plant fossils (with a few marine invertebrates if you look closely), some are very strange looking rocks and markings, and some are a total mystery to me.

Funny how so many of these images seem more alien than all of last week’s post – seemingly earthlike landscapes of Mars!

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Thanks for the visit.

 

011818: From the Museums

Snow and cold outside. Another opportunity to dig back into the archives. The last two posts contained images from museums and they obviously contained fossils that were finished to the finest standards – very different from my usual finds. I like the aesthetics of each for different reasons.

So this week I decided to continue an exploration of my museum shoots and see what I might have missed the first time around. Most of today’s images are newly worked and there is much more there to be mined!

Here are five sets of images – three in each – from five different museum collections. The first three images (above) are from the collection of the Paleontological Research Institution in Trumansburg NY.

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The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven CT

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The New York State Museum, Albany NY

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The Gallery of Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy, Paris, France

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The Natural History Museum of Florence, Florence, Italy

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Thanks for the visit.

011118: Crinoids

Last week, while reviewing the bivalve images I had taken during my two trips to the Paleontological Research Institute, I ran across and was reminded of all the beautiful crinoids that I found in their collections as well.

Crinoids  are oftentimes referred to contemporaneously as Sea Lillies, thanks I believe to their shape. They are also thought of as “living fossils” since they can be traced all the way back to the Ordovician period she 450 million years ago!

I have had the good fortune of photographing crinoids from a number of museum collections. I personally find them to be something rather magical. So I spent a few days immersed in the world of crinoids that I am now sharing with you this week.

In order to fill out this week’s post I have augmented the PRI crinoids with some from the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven Connecticut.

These first seven images are from the PRI collection.

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The remaining eight images (below) are from the Yale Peabody collection.

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Thanks for the visit.