020818: Stranger Things (Rock Version)

While putting images together for an upcoming project I ran across the opening image of plant fossils that seems to have an almost calligraphic feel to it – a sort of written signage from Nature itself! All of today’s images come from days of shooting several years ago during the summer following Hurricane Irene. The tumult from the flooding tore apart Schoharie Creek and uncovered many amazing things. Some of the images are plant fossils (with a few marine invertebrates if you look closely), some are very strange looking rocks and markings, and some are a total mystery to me.

Funny how so many of these images seem more alien than all of last week’s post – seemingly earthlike landscapes of Mars!

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Thanks for the visit.

 

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020118: New Landscapes

Since the earliest days of photography the landscape has provided seemingly endless subject matter for the adventurous photographer. From the exploits of William Henry Jackson in the 1800s to Ansel Adams in the 1900s to today’s latest crop of photographers, gaining access to the “perfect” vantage point has always been key.

As technology has rapidly advanced that access has expanded greatly. Aerial photography gave us fresh and new views of our environment. Drones have now vastly expanded that view.

And today satellites and space missions have introduced us to views we never could have  imagined. In a previous post (Circles and Arcs) I introduced stunning images of Saturn and its moons taken by NASA’s Cassini spacecraft.

Today’s images come from NASA’s Mars Curiosity Rover. Yes, these landscapes, or should I say “Marscapes”, show us scenes that seem almost familiar.

Thanks to the fine people at NASA there are huge collections of images available to all for viewing. In the case of Mars there are many, many high resolution images available with all necessary scientific information relating to each specific location photographed.

FYI – NASA’s budget continues to be cut. Non-science bureaucrats have been given the reins at government agencies

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Thanks for the visit.

012518: A Bit of Color

We all deal in different ways with the cold, gray winter days that the season often provides. Some sit under heat lamps to mimic the otherwise missing rays of the sun. Some seek out professional help to combat S.A.D. (seasonal affective disorder). Some simply sleep until Spring (like the bear that lives in the woods behind my studio!).

On the other hand, I try to engage color – the brighter and bolder the better! And this week I found it in butterflies. Today’s images come from a couple of sessions I had at La Specola, a division of the Natural History Museum of Florence. Again, like last week’s post, revisiting that photo library gave me new, previously overlooked, opportunities for exploration.

I don’t know if there is cause and effect at work here. I must say that the colors not only brightened my day but the sky just cleared this morning, the sun is shining, and the snow has gone away!

Neat trick if that’s all that is involved! I hope these images brighten your day.

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Thanks for the visit.

011818: From the Museums

Snow and cold outside. Another opportunity to dig back into the archives. The last two posts contained images from museums and they obviously contained fossils that were finished to the finest standards – very different from my usual finds. I like the aesthetics of each for different reasons.

So this week I decided to continue an exploration of my museum shoots and see what I might have missed the first time around. Most of today’s images are newly worked and there is much more there to be mined!

Here are five sets of images – three in each – from five different museum collections. The first three images (above) are from the collection of the Paleontological Research Institution in Trumansburg NY.

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The Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven CT

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The New York State Museum, Albany NY

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The Gallery of Paleontology and Comparative Anatomy, Paris, France

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The Natural History Museum of Florence, Florence, Italy

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Thanks for the visit.

011118: Crinoids

Last week, while reviewing the bivalve images I had taken during my two trips to the Paleontological Research Institute, I ran across and was reminded of all the beautiful crinoids that I found in their collections as well.

Crinoids  are oftentimes referred to contemporaneously as Sea Lillies, thanks I believe to their shape. They are also thought of as “living fossils” since they can be traced all the way back to the Ordovician period she 450 million years ago!

I have had the good fortune of photographing crinoids from a number of museum collections. I personally find them to be something rather magical. So I spent a few days immersed in the world of crinoids that I am now sharing with you this week.

In order to fill out this week’s post I have augmented the PRI crinoids with some from the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History in New Haven Connecticut.

These first seven images are from the PRI collection.

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The remaining eight images (below) are from the Yale Peabody collection.

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Thanks for the visit.

010418: Bivalves and Barnacles

Several years ago I had the opportunity to photograph parts of the fossil collection belonging to the Paleontological Research Institute in Trumansburg, NY. Among the many and varied fossils I worked with were these barnacle laden bivalves. Since I have long forgotten the technical/historical information on these marine invertebrates I cannot give you any accurate information on them – other than to say that they are uniquely beautiful and intriguing. I hope you think so as well.

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Thanks for the visit. And best wishes to all of you at the start of this new year!

STAY WARM!!!

121417: Year End 2017

Ever since I first began posting this blog six years ago I have closed out each year with a selection of images from the year gone by. With an annual production of 600 to 700 fresh images posted yearly I like to take this time to look back and choose one last grouping from the year gone by.

So today I present a mix of images, not necessarily the best, not necessarily my favorites, but rather images that struck a particular chord when I reviewed the year past – ones that I thought deserved another look. Of course, then, it would be a wide mix – some fossils, some drawings and mixed media works, and other assorted subjects.

Hopefully these disparate images flow smoothly and are pleasing to the eye!

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Best wishes to you and yours this holiday season. Here’s hoping for a safe and happy new year to all.