080918: Stuff

I found a rusty old box at a yard sale last Saturday. I never know when something like that might make a good prop. The deal came to one dollar but I had to take its contents. I am now the proud owner of a rusty box full of rusty nuts and bolts. And that is how artists’ studios fill up with all kinds of stuff. Some might even call it junk.

As I looked at the contents of the box I soon realized that I have shelves and boxes full of stuff, work surfaces filled with multiple items, etc. And that’s today’s subject – all from my studio inside and out. Nuts and bolts followed by a near infinity of paint brushes to…

Chalks

Box of Props

Reams of Scribbled Paper

Wiry Branches

Dead and Dying Flowers

Gourds

Fossils

Shells

A Garden of Props

Rocks from Jasper Beach

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On a completely different note, I ran across these two images in an old folder and had to bring them out – both from about ten years ago.

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One final note – we’ll be away for a couple of weeks, eating lots of ice cream!

Thanks for the visit.

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080218: August

Seems like summer has barely begun and all of a sudden it is August, to me at least. I’ve been so busy in my studio that I’ve barely been outdoors. I thought of that as I was putting this post together. I started off with some fresh fossil images but soon veered away toward images from past forays in the car and on foot – simply put, I needed to remind myself that there is a world beyond the studio!

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So here we go outdoors – from an old locomotive to a hummingbird et al.

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Thanks for the visit.

072618: Three Groupings

I’ve been going in a few different directions lately as today’s post reflects. Group One consists of  images of pods from the baptisia plant. I know nothing about gardening. But I do know when it’s time to cut something down and bring it into the studio! Group Two is made up of new fossil images. And Group Three is a selection of new mixed media pieces I am working on.

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Thanks for the visit.

071818: Bones

While browsing my photo library last week I kept noticing how many images of bones I have accumulated – not so surprising for all the time I’ve spent in museums and their various storage rooms. So today’s topic is bones large and small – from a bird skull to a whale’s jaw.

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Last week’s post ended with a photoshop “gimmick” as I described it – flopping half of an image to create symmetry – and when you can sometimes get away with it. A lot has to do with the subject matter, how it is cropped, how it meshes, etc. Well, the bones seemed appropriate and that led me on a little side trip. I liked it so much that I grabbed a few fossil images (equally appropriate) and even an old image of a leaf.

I hope you enjoy this small selection of oddities!

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Thanks for the visit.

071218: Back to the Library

Once again I’ve been diving into my library of images from my shooting at the various divisions of the Florence Museum of Natural History. Today’s images are some of the more interesting and odder outtakes from a variety of its collections – Mammals, Reptiles, Entomology, Echinoderms, Paleontology, and Botanica.

So, from whale bones and reptiles to butterflies and fossils (and much in between):

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These last two images need a bit of explanation. Gorgonocephalus agassizi, otherwise known as underwater “basket stars,” remind me of Medusa, the Greek mythological monster with snakes instead of hair. Interesting enough, as the image above shows. The second basket star (below), found off Cape Cod in 1888, seemed to call out for a different treatment.

There are some Photoshop “tricks” that can easily become rather “gimmicky” and wise to avoid using. But sometimes a particular image just lends itself to the gimmick. And, used carefully and judiciously, it can provide some very interesting results. In this case, the horizontal flop gave me something natural as well as unnatural, an eye-catching symmetry from meandering randomness! More on this “trick” next week.

Thanks for the visit.

062818: Afternoon Light

Like everything else outside my studio, my deck (where I often photograph) and its railing is always covered with fossil rocks. I try to keep new finds and old favorites close and in view. Different times of day, different weather conditions, even different seasons seem to imbue each fossil with “different personalities!”

Late afternoon sun was the trigger for this week’s images. A hard, warm light catches the deck and rakes across the rocks, providing definition and a little drama.

Once again, these are all Devonian Period marine invertebrates (app. 387 million years old), all found within a few miles from my studio! As if just living here in the upper Hudson Valley isn’t enough!

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I’ve been busy in several directions lately. So I thought I’d include a couple of mixed media pieces from the week past.

Thanks for the visit.

062118: Continued

I couldn’t resist using last week’s backdrop again for this week’s images. Today’s fossils include gastropods, brachiopods, crinoid ossicles, coral, and various trilobite parts (including the one below – a Moroccan trilobite I bought in a Florence flea market). All the rest make up a nice little Devonian sampler.

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Thanks for the visit.