0326: Marist Show_continued

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For those unable to attend I thought I’d share more of the upcoming show today.

The opening image is titled “Gilboa Tree Fossil 3768.”

Here is the information, including directions, for anyone interested in attending:

Wednesday April 1st – Saturday April 25th

Gallery Hours: Monday thru Saturday – Noon ’til 5pm

Opening Reception: Wednesday April 1st – 5pm -7pm

Marist College Art Gallery

3399 North Road

Poughkeepsie NY 12601

Directions – From Route 9, turn onto Fulton Street and make the first right onto Beck Place. The studio and gallery are at the end of the street, on the right.

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Gilboa Tree Fossil 3656

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Gilboa Tree Fossil 4640

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Swarm 4432

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Quarry 7368

Thank you for the visit.

0319: All Packed Up

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Just finished packing up all my prints for my upcoming show at Marist College in Poughkeepsie NY – Opening on April 1st (Wednesday) 5-7 PM. For all my NYC friends it’s a fine opportunity to drive an hour north and take a midweek break. For anyone and everyone else interested please come out and join us. Marist has a wonderful large gallery that I will be sharing with painter Fran O’Neill. 

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For those who can’t make it I thought I’d share the images with you this week and possibly next week. Not much else to add, so please enjoy this mix of images.

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Kaaterskill 6324

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Quarry 7348

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Ausable 2786

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Maine 5310

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Ausable 2781

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Quarry 1820

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Maine 5568

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Devonian Trace Fossil 5568

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Kaaterskill 6334

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Maine 5404

Thanks for the visit.

0312: Almost Spring

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We hit fifty degrees yesterday – what a welcome relief! Spring is near. For whatever reason, my thoughts turned to the trees that are soon to bloom. So I put together a group of tree images for the post today. No fossils this time. Hopefully melting snow will uncover some and provide me with fresh new fossil pics. Until then please enjoy what Mother Nature surrounds us with. (More on Mother Nature at the end of this post).

Today’s opening image is from an olive grove near the town of Assisi.

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Siena, Italy

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Vermont

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Lake Champlain, NY

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Paris

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Boboli Gardens, Florence,Italy

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Platte Clove NY

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Leonardo da Vinci birthplace, Vinci, Italy

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Cairo NY

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Lexington VA

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Opus 40, Saugerties NY

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These four color images are possible late additions to my upcoming show at Marist College. The opening is set for April 1st, 5-7pm. More on that in days to come. For now I thought they would be a good counterpoint to all the black and white.

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This last one is part of an entirely different project. I had to include it since I just finished it and I think it holds much promise.

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A final note – regarding Mother Nature. I was knocked out by a video that a friend posted on Facebook yesterday, so much so that I needed to share it with you. It comes from the website Nature is Speaking. There are eight brief two minute videos beautifully shot with voiceovers – very powerful statements that need to be considered. Perhaps a donation might be in order.

Thanks for the visit.

0305: Ice

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Ice, not snow, has been the bane of my existence this Winter. The thick ice that blanketed my driveway at the beginning of the season will finally leave when Spring gets here. So, like most all of my neighbors, the thought of 40 degree weather gives us hope.

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It was ironic, then, that another encounter with ice should leave me positively elated. Last weekend, friends of ours (Pat and John), who live right on the Hudson River, invited a small group over to experience the ice on the river and share the strange magic of a walk out onto the Hudson. The day was beautiful. No wind. The sun was bright. And two feet thick ice was the “ground.”

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Most of the ice was covered by 4-6 inches of snow. There were areas, though, where the wind cleared off the snow and other areas where irregularities created uneven surfaces that allowed the ice to bubble up, thus providing me with the best surprise of the day.

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Looking into these clear spots was like viewing a cats eye marble – fascinating patterns under the surface. Like the old adage about how every cloud has a silver lining, the thick ice of the Hudson held much beauty and surprise as well as some quiet, solemn moments in nature.

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Last week, I chose to explore outtakes from my visit to the Yale Peabody Museum. And I was surprised that so many fine images went unnoticed through the first round of selections. Since the snow has prevented me from producing fresh, new fossil images I decided to look through the library for other museum experiences. I’m happy to have rediscovered the work I did at the Museum of the Earth (the Paleontological Research Institution). So today I have some fresh outtakes from that experience.

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One last note about the Hudson River experience. I was so excited by my discoveries that I went back out there the following day. Gone was the tranquil warmth and quiet solitude – replaced by winds that blew so hard I could barely stand in place. Sometimes all of life is in the timing!

Thanks for the visit.

0226: Revisiting the Peabody

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By “revisiting” I mean looking over images in my library from my visit a while back. Two days shooting at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History left me with too many “selects!” – a problem one likes to have. Actually, it’s hard to miss when the subjects are so impressive. It was a  wonderful experience. The fossils were certainly a wider array than I am familiar with (from Devonian crinoids to Jurassic shrimp).

Browsing through that  picture library also led me to a group of moody images from a quiet day in the Tuscan hills.These images proved to be a fine escape from the cold and snow and allowed me to explore some different techniques – while at the same time offering a glimmer of hope that Spring arrive soon!

Enjoy the pics and stay warm.

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Thanks for the visit.

0219: Space

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When I first set eyes on this structure I saw it as a true monument – with a primal, “Stonehenge” sort of presence – one that spoke to the significant steps we, as a species, took heading off into space. These two images are from a story I shot years ago (pre-digital) at the Kennedy Space Center: The first is a cannibalized gantry and the other an outbuilding from which some of the earliest manned space flights originated. The condition of these abandoned buildings reflect the reality of America’s current lack of substantial involvement in space (and all the tangential discoveries lost as well).

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What brought that to mind was a notice I saw the other day about a large photography auction From the Earth to the Moon: Vintage NASA Photographs . Hundreds of wonderful prints, many never seen publicly, show the brilliance of the achievement.

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I pulled these two images from the downloadable PDF, a treasure trove for anyone interested, with descriptions accompanying each print in the auction. And while I marveled at the events they gave witness to I felt a bit of nostalgia. Perhaps nostalgic for a time when science was respected and accepted for its role and value in a culture. And for the pursuit of knowledge. All for the greater good.

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I’ve written before about the anti-science crowd, the cheaply transparent “I’m not a scientist but…” politicians, et al. And I hate to belabor it. But these are some of the same people who, as we saw last week with current leader of the pack presidential contender, Scott Walker, can’t quite say if he believes in evolution! (This is the same Scott Walker, governor of Wisconsin, who plans to cut hundreds of millions of dollars from the state education funds.) There are consequences when zealots and charlatans gain hold of the reins of power.

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They might even question the age of these fossils I wish to share with you today – all Devonian marine invertebrates approximately 387 million years old. Its a strange and interesting world we earthlings inhabit! Enjoy it and enjoy this invertebrate mix.

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Thanks for the visit.

0212: A Museum Experience

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I have two groups of new images today. One is part of my ongoing exploration of the marine invertebrate fossils abundant in the immediate area. The other is a bit of rule-breaking – shooting where conditions don’t normally allow. As often can happen when disregarding the rules, interesting visual possibilities arise.

So let’s start with this mix of gastropods, brachiopods and coral:

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I had a conversation recently with a friend and fellow photographer about what catches one’s eye, that demands you pick up the camera and explore. Oftentimes, it’s not the brilliant or the grandiose that is most compelling, but rather that which is nearby, sometimes even underfoot (That’s how I got started with the fossils – I kept tripping over them!). An inquisitive mind open to one’s surroundings, whatever they might be, can yield up some interesting (and fun) results.

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In this case, it was time to kill at a museum one day that led to this set of images. Wildlife dioramas, too dimly lit to shoot normally, suggested intentional blurring. Digital screens give immediate feedback. So, each capture can easily suggest the next one and the next one, etc. In my case, this  turns into a kind of intuitive choreography that develops in real time. To me the results in several of these images tend to suggest an almost feral mystery.

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I ran across this in an old folder – 1992 – That’s me on set working with the Muppets!

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Thanks for the visit.